Conrad Schick

Portrait of Dr Conrad Schick

Dr Conrad Schick

He was born in Bitz, Württemberg, Germany in 1822, studied in Korntal and Basel and moved to Jerusalem 24 years old.

Conrad Schick became well-known as the city architect of the 1900-century Jerusalem, as well as a famous member and expert of a great number of archaeological projects but also author of many articles about Palestine, mainly published in the London-based Palestine Exploration Quarterly – PEF as well as the German Zeitschrift des Deutschen Palästina-Vereins – ZDPV, printed in Leipzig.

He is also remembered as builder of a great number of meticulous models, primarly about the Holy Sepulchre and the Temple Mount or the Haram Al Sharif in Jerusalem, models shown in many places as pedagogical tools telling the story about both past and present buildings.

For many, like me, he is the builder of the most famous house of Jerusalem “Beit Tavor”, his own residence at HaNeviim 58 in Jerusalem – the Street of the Prophets. This wonderful house today host the Swedish Theological Institute – STI and also the local parish of the Lutheran Church of Sweden.

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10 Responses to “Conrad Schick”

  1. Kjell Jonasson Says:

    Imponerande och intressant! Vilken dokumentation du samlat ihop!

  2. Stephen Felkner Says:

    What of his faith?

    • uffepeter Says:

      I don´t know much about him self. Since he came from Württemberg he was of Lutheran faith. The years at Korntal also formed him as did the time at Chrishona.
      As he came to J-lem he must have been influenced from other churches and traditions, but also from other religions. As he died it was said “he was mourned by Jews, Muslims and Christians alike”

  3. Håkan Bengtsson Says:

    I liked the the new information about the chairs. Next time I will sit down more respectfully.
    /Håkan

  4. Klaus Schick Says:

    So interesting to me. I first time read about Conrad Schick 10 years ago. Like Conrad, I too lived for two years in Basel, got inspired there to visit Israel at age 24 in 1970 and lived in Naot Mordechai for 5 month. Makes me wonder if we are related somehow. I had Schick relatives in Wuertemberg and Burlafingen (near Ulm)
    Visits to Jerusalem use to be unusually intensive experiences for me.
    Klaus Schick

  5. Rosemary Brown Says:

    I have found some old photographs whilst clearing out my late parents’ house. I believe they are of Schick’s models and would have been taken by my grandfather in the early 1900s.

    The photos are titled:
    i) MT MORIAH – ORIGINAL CONTOUR
    ii) HADRIAN’S TEMPLE AD 135
    iii) TABERNACLE – BC 1487
    iv) HARAM ES-SHERIF AD 691
    v) JUSTINIAN’S CHURCH AD 530
    vi) SOLOMON’S TEMPLE BC 1000
    vii) EZRA’S TEMPLE BC 579
    viii) HEROD’S TEMPLE BC 30

    They are all large photos, approx. 26cm x 20cm and in excellent condition as they have been stored between two thick pieces of board.

    If they have any value and anyone is interested, please get back to me.

  6. Niels Henrik Olesen, Copenhagen Says:

    Who is Matthias Schick? Is he related to Conrad and how?

    • uffepeter Says:

      Hello Denmark!
      I’m not that familiar with the family, check under Family on my page. Only three girls survived and they married and then got other names!

      Greetings from old Sweden!
      Ulf P

    • Klaus Schick Says:

      My Fathers name was Matthias Schick. He was born in October 1913 in Emmendingen (near Freiburg) Through his Arian Document required by the Nazi-regime I found that his Family originated in Burlafingen near New Ulm. They had a Farm and most Sons then had to move some where els to make a living – my grandfather Dionysius Schick must have moved from there to the Freiburg Area while other may have gone north towards Wuerttemberg. An Uncle of mine lifed near Balingen in Wurttemberg.

  7. Andrew Stein Says:

    In the tunnels under Temple Mount, there is a signature in pencil on the drainage tunnel rocks that clearly reads “Conrad Schick 1863”

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